ADHD – what are the symptoms?

ADHD stands for Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder.  According to Developmental Paediatrician, Mark Selikowitz, it affects behaviour and sometimes impacts on our ability to learn.  Millions of people around the world have been diagnosed with ADHD and have worked out how to manage it and lead fabulous lives.

There are three types of ADHD:-

  1. Hyperactive-Impulsive
  2. Inattentive and
  3. Combined (which is a mix of both).

So what are the symptoms of ADHD? Dr Grohol of Pyschcentral.com and Selikovitz, provided an in-depth explanation of the symptoms of ADHD. Here is a brief summary of the (first) two very different types, but remember that children who display these things may not necessarily have ADHD.

Hyperactive-impulsive Type

The hyperactive-impulsive type of ADHD usually shows up in early in a child’s life, during those pre-school or early primary school years.  These children are very spontaneous, often act without thinking and have trouble sitting still.

Research has shown that this type of ADHD affects more boys than girls.

Typical symptoms include:

  • Fidgeting and tapping hands or feet, or squirming in their seats
  • Running or climbing in situations where it is inappropriate
  • Talking too much
  • Interrupting or intruding on others
  • Lack of patience
  • Displaying restlessness

Inattentive Type

The inattentive form of ADHD usually shows up in children during primary and high school years, when they start experiencing difficulty with academic performance.

These children are commonly described by their teachers and parents as a ‘quiet under achiever’ and even ‘dreamy’.

Typical symptoms include:

  • Trouble with attention to detail
  • Making careless mistakes in homework or chores
  • Easily distracted when working on tasks or being spoken to
  • Finds difficulty engaging with activities that requiring a lot of thought or when learning something new
  • Forgets or loses things needed for a task, like books or pencils
  • Fails to finish assigned tasks like home work or chores

 

Help us crowd fund the Kindom app.

You can make a difference and help make Kindom a reality.  Jump on our crowd funding campaign and help us produce the app for smarter parenting, on Indiegogo at https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/kindom-the-smarter-parenting-app#.

Be part of the Kindom community

Please help us spread the word – it is largely through social media and word-of-mouth that initiatives like this become successful, so we really do need your help.

We are on Facebook where we are building a community to engage in conversations with those interested in Kindom, parenting and helping children reach their full potential. Follow us and spread the word via https://www.facebook.com/kindomco.

If you have any ideas or suggestions for us please don’t hesitate to drop us a note on Facebook or email info@kinchipsystems.co.

 

Blog sources and further Information

Grohol, J. (2013) Childhood & Teenager ADHD Symptoms. Available at: http://psychcentral.com/lib/childhood-teenager-adhd-symptoms/ (Accessed: 15 July 2015)

Selikowitz, M. (2009) ADHD. 2nd edn. New York: Oxford University Press

 

 

Autism Spectrum Disorder – what are the symptoms?

According to ASPECT Australia, Autism Spectrum Disorder, or ASD, affects a person’s communication and social skills. Those with autism also display repetitive behaviour and narrow interests. A child is born with the lifelong condition, however they can live normal lives depending on the diagnosis.

According to the new manual for autism, an autism diagnosis is ranked by 1, 2 or three depending on the support it needs

So what are the symptoms of ASD? According to Proffessor Uta Frith and ASPECT Australia there are three main symptoms of ASD; here is a brief summary of them.

Reciprocal Social Interactions

  • Has a hard time developing and maintain relationships
  • Trouble understanding nonverbal communication like gestures, facial expressions and physical contact
  • Finds it difficult to express their needs and empathising with others
  • Often seems aloof and distant

 Communication

  • Learns to speak and communicate late, sometimes never at all
  • Those who can speak may be limited or do so unusually
  • Only speaks of topics that interests themselves
  • Has trouble starting and holding conversations

 Repetitive Activities and Narrow Interests

  • Is often seen doing repetitive movements like rocking and flapping
  • Repeats routines day after day
  • Doesn’t like to change their routines
  • Concentrates on narrow areas of interest
  • May be over-sensitive to loud noises, bright lights and busy environments
  • May be under-sensitive to smells tastes even pain

 

ABOUT Kindom – Helping parents develop their children

At Kindom we are busy developing an app that will help parents all over the world. We have now launched our Crowd funding campaign to take our prototype into production. If we reach our $50,000 goal we will produce v1.0 of Kindom, which will let you store all your family records in one, secure place.  If we reach our stretch targets, we will be able to add more tools and resources to the app, advanced insights with health and education professionals and a fully developed knowledge database.

Help us crowd fund the Kindom app.

You can make a difference and help make Kindom a reality.  Jump on our crowd funding campaign and help us produce the app for smarter parenting, on Indiegogo at https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/kindom-the-smarter-parenting-app#.

Be part of the Kindom community

Please help us spread the word – it is largely through social media and word-of-mouth that initiatives like this become successful, so we really do need your help.

We are on Facebook where we are building a community to engage in conversations with those interested in Kindom, parenting and helping children reach their full potential. Follow us and spread the word via https://www.facebook.com/kindomco.

If you have any ideas or suggestions for us please don’t hesitate to drop us a note on Facebook or email info@kinchipsystems.co.

Sources and further Information

Autism Characteristics (2015) Available at: http://www.autismspectrum.org.au/content/characteristics?gclid=CjwKEAjwiZitBRCy0pb3rIbG9XwSJACmuvvzntxUaU4QPmfq953ghysijX3P1BRxEKISm-84sMh2qBoC6lXw_wcB (Accessed: 16 July 2015)

 

Frith, U. (2008) Autism: A Very Short Introduction. New York: Oxford University Press

 

Five tips to support early language development

Laughing Mother And Baby outdoors. Nature. Beauty Mum and her Child playing in Park together. Outdoor Portrait of Smiling and Happy family. Joy. Mom and Baby

Australia’s Raising Children’s Network offers practical tips to support early language development.  Here are five simple tasks they suggest to encourage speech and develop literacy.

Talk with your baby

Treating your baby as a talker should begin straight away. When you finish talking, give her a turn and wait for a response – those sounds and babbles are the beginning of language development.

Respond to your baby

As your baby starts to use gestures and words, you should respond. For example, if your child points to a toy, respond as if your child is saying, ‘Can I have that?’ or ‘I like that’.  Use words when you respond and explain why.  It is amazing how much babies have to say, even before words develop.

Everyday talking

Talk about what is happening and even if your baby doesn’t understand right now, they soon will. Use lots of different words, describe what you’re doing, and talk about the things they are doing.

When your child starts telling stories, encourage them to talk about things in the past and in the future. Discuss plans for the next day. Introduce new words.

It’s important for children to hear different words in different contexts. This helps them learn the meaning and function of words.

Reading

Read and share books with your baby and keep using more complex books as they grow. Talk about the pictures. Use a variety of books and link what’s in the book to what’s happening in your child’s life. Books with interesting pictures are a great focus for talking.  Point to words as you say them as this shows your child the link between written and spoken words.

Following your child’s lead

If your child starts a conversation through talking, gesture or behaviour, respond to it, making sure you stick to the topic your child started.  Repeat and build on what your child says. For example, if she says, ‘Apple,’ you can say, ‘You want an apple. You want a red apple. Let’s have a red apple together’.

 

ABOUT Kindom – Helping parents develop their children

At Kindom we are busy developing an app that will help parents all over the world. We have now launched our Crowdfunding campaign to take our prototype into production.  If we reach our $50,000 goal we will produce v1.0 of Kindom, which will let you store all your family records in one, secure place.  If we reach our stretch targets, we will be able to add more tools and resources to the app, advanced insights with health and education professionals and a fully developed knowledge database.

Help us crowdfund the Kindom app.

You can make a difference and help make Kindom a reality.  Jump on our crowdfunding campaign and help us produce the app for smarter parenting, on Indiegogo at https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/kindom-the-smarter-parenting-app#.

Be part of the Kindom community

Please help us spread to word – it is largely through social media and word-of-mouth that initiatives like this become successful, so we really do need your help.

We are on Facebook where we are building a community to engage in conversations with those interested in Kindom, parenting and helping children reach their full potential.   Follow us and spread the word via https://www.facebook.com/kindomco.

If you have any ideas or suggestions for us please don’t hesitate to drop us a note on facebook or email info@kinchipsystems.co.

Kindom Crowdfunding Video

On Tuesday 14th July we launched the Kindom™ crowdfunding campaign at Spacecubed in Perth. Thank you to everyone who turned up. We appreciate the support.

Whilst we are raising funds to fasttrack development of Kindom™, another key objective is to raise awareness and start the conversation about what can be achieved by using  technology to empower smarter parenting and child development.

Starting at only $29, you get lifetime access to Kindom™ Community. If you want more in-depth insights and decisions support, please check out the Kindom™ Insights and Kindom™ Decisions perks. The great thing is that you can choose to gift Kindom subscription.

Become one of the first get access to Kindom™ by contributing now!

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